Virginia Treasurer & Tax Collector

Find Virginia treasurer, tax collector, tax assessor, and property assessor. Treasurers and tax collectors provide information on property searches, tax bills, property liens, tax assessed values, and deductions.


Treasurers & Tax Collectors by County

Accomack County Amelia County Amherst County Appomattox County Arlington County Augusta County Bath County Bedford County Bland County Botetourt County Brunswick County Buchanan County Buckingham County Buena Vista Campbell County Caroline County Charles City County Charlotte County Charlottesville Chesapeake Chesterfield County Clarke County Covington Craig County Culpeper County Cumberland County Danville Dickenson County Dinwiddie County Emporia Essex County Fairfax Fauquier County Floyd County Fluvanna County Franklin County Frederick County Giles County Gloucester County Goochland County Grayson County Greene County Halifax County Hampton Hanover County Harrisonburg Highland County Isle of Wight County King George County King William County King and Queen County Lancaster County Lee County Lexington Loudoun County Louisa County Lunenburg County Madison County Manassas Martinsville Mathews County Mecklenburg County Middlesex County Montgomery County Nelson County New Kent County Newport News Norfolk Northampton County Northumberland County Norton Nottoway County Orange County Page County Patrick County Petersburg Pittsylvania County Powhatan County Prince Edward County Prince George County Prince William County Pulaski County Radford Rappahannock County Richmond County Richmond Roanoke County Roanoke Rockingham County Russell County Salem Scott County Shenandoah County Smyth County Southampton County Spotsylvania County Stafford County Surry County Sussex County Tazewell County Virginia Beach Warren County Washington County Waynesboro Westmoreland County Williamsburg Winchester Wise County Wythe County York County

What does a Treasurer and Tax Collector do?

The treasurer and tax collector are responsible for collecting money owed to a local government. The government receives these funds from property taxes, inheritance taxes, sales taxes, rents on government-owned properties, and from a variety of other fees. Although in small communities these roles may be held by the same person, a tax collector is responsible for collecting the money, while the treasurer is responsible for accounting and disbursements of the money.

The specific responsibilities for treasurers and tax collectors vary from state to state and town to town. Tax collectors and treasurers are elected to their offices. In some communities, the treasurer collects fees for business licenses, hunting licenses, and concealed weapons permits. In other communities, the tax collector collects payments for parking violations and driver's licenses.

The treasurer maintains the money in appropriate accounts and disburses it to pay for services and benefits as directed by government officials. Local treasurers may also be responsible for investing money for school districts, aviation authorities and waste facilities. In communities that have financial difficulties, the treasurer may assist with financial planning and budgeting.

Commonly asked questions about Treasurers and Tax Collectors

How often are Treasurers and Tax Collectors elected?

In most states, the treasurers and tax collectors are elected every four years. The offices of treasurer and tax collector are supposed to be nonpartisan, and it's important for voters to be sure of voting for their chosen treasurer and tax collector.

How can I avoid paying penalties on my tax bill?

The best way to avoid having penalties assessed on your tax bill is to pay it on time or before the due date. Most treasurers and tax collectors will accept payments through the mail, online or via drop-in. Most jurisdictions have set percentages that are assessed on late payments and those percentages usually increase the longer you wait to pay.

How does someone become a Tax Collector?

People who want to be tax collectors for a living must be adequately trained for the job. Since states have varying requirements for tax collectors, it is wise to look at the requirements in your particular state. Some states have limited the tuition fees that colleges can charge for training tax collectors. States usually require tax collectors to submit to a criminal background check before employment.