Missouri Food Stamp Office

Find Missouri Food Stamp Offices and SNAP benefits. Food stamp offices provide information on foodstamps and SNAP program (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) elibility (application, guidelines and income requirements), EBT/SNAP balance lookups, card numbers and mybenefits.


Food Stamp Offices by County

Adair County Andrew County Atchison County Audrain County Barry County Barton County Bates County Benton County Bollinger County Boone County Buchanan County Butler County Callaway County Camden County Cape Girardeau County Carroll County Carter County Cass County Cedar County Chariton County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Cole County Cooper County Crawford County Dallas County Daviess County DeKalb County Dent County Douglas County Dunklin County Franklin County Gasconade County Gentry County Grundy County Harrison County Henry County Hickory County Holt County Howard County Howell County Iron County Jackson County Jasper County Jefferson County Johnson County Laclede County Lafayette County Lawrence County Lewis County Lincoln County Linn County Livingston County Macon County Madison County Maries County Marion County McDonald County Mercer County Miller County Mississippi County Moniteau County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Nodaway County Oregon County Osage County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry County Pettis County Phelps County Pike County Platte County Polk County Pulaski County Putnam County Ralls County Randolph County Ray County Reynolds County Ripley County Saline County Schuyler County Scotland County Scott County Shannon County Shelby County St. Charles County St. Clair County St. Francois County St. Louis Ste. Genevieve County Stoddard County Stone County Sullivan County Taney County Texas County Vernon County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Worth County Wright County

What is a Food Stamp Office?

A Food Stamp Office refers to a state agency that administers the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Commonly referred to as "Food Stamps" SNAP benefits are a form of nutrition assistance provided to income-eligible households through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). SNAP benefits are intended to reduce food insecurity and poverty by supplementing the food purchasing power of low-income households. SNAP funds are distributed to the states. The states have a measure of flexibility in how they administer the program and target the benefits.

Eligibility for SNAP benefits is largely based on a household's income and assets. Income and asset limits vary based on household size, and are typically less restrictive for households with elderly or disabled members. SNAP requires able-bodied adults without dependents to work or participate in qualified training or education programs in order to receive benefits. Children, seniors, and the disabled are exempt from the work requirement. A person must be a citizen, or lawfully documented non-citizen, to qualify for SNAP benefits. Households that receive cash benefits from another means-tested program, such as Supplemental Social Security Income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), or General Assistance, automatically qualify for SNAP.

Participating households receive a monthly benefit that may be used to purchase household food items or plants and seeds to grow food. The benefit is provided on an electronic debit card that can be used at supermarkets, grocery stores, convenience stores, farmers markets, and other places selling eligible items. In some states, the same card is used for other cash assistance programs.

In most states, the Department of Social Services, Department of Human Services, or similar agency administers SNAP. Some states delegate much of the program administration to the counties. The agency administering SNAP is responsible for accepting and processing applications from households, determining eligibility, and distributing the benefits. Applications are accepted at agency field offices, though almost every state also offers the option of applying online. The agencies that administer SNAP typically administer other federal assistance programs, such as TANF and Medicaid, as well as state assistance programs. As a result, these agencies are often able to offer integrated case management services and have developed shared information technology and eligibility systems.