Missouri Fire Department

Find Missouri fire departments, city fire stations, firefighters, brigades, chiefs, inspectors, marshals, and local volunteers. Fire departments provide information on fire risk assessment, permits, fire alarms, and safety guidance.


Fire Departments by County

Adair County Andrew County Atchison County Audrain County Barry County Barton County Bates County Benton County Bollinger County Boone County Buchanan County Butler County Caldwell County Callaway County Camden County Cape Girardeau County Carroll County Carter County Cass County Cedar County Chariton County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Cole County Cooper County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Daviess County DeKalb County Dent County Douglas County Dunklin County Franklin County Gasconade County Gentry County Greene County Grundy County Harrison County Henry County Hickory County Holt County Howard County Howell County Iron County Jackson County Jasper County Jefferson County Johnson County Knox County Laclede County Lafayette County Lawrence County Lewis County Lincoln County Linn County Livingston County Macon County Madison County Maries County Marion County McDonald County Mercer County Miller County Mississippi County Moniteau County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Nodaway County Oregon County Osage County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry County Pettis County Phelps County Pike County Platte County Polk County Pulaski County Putnam County Randolph County Ray County Reynolds County Ripley County Saline County Schuyler County Scotland County Scott County Shannon County Shelby County St. Charles County St. Clair County St. Francois County St. Louis County St. Louis Ste. Genevieve County Stoddard County Stone County Sullivan County Taney County Texas County Vernon County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Worth County Wright County

What does a Fire Department do?

A fire department is responsible for firefighting, fire prevention, and emergency medical services. In addition to putting out fires, members of the fire department provide rescue services and disaster recovery assistance. Most of these departments are operated by city and county governments. Some departments, mostly in small rural communities, are staffed entirely by volunteers, although, paid, professional firemen staff the typical firefighting organization.

Some departments specialize in fighting wildfires, and others are trained to respond to industrial and hazardous materials fires. Firefighters are known for their quick response and 24-hour availability, and for their professionalism. They also perform fire-safety inspections including checking smoke detectors, and may supply fire extinguishers to people who need them.

Commonly asked questions about Fire Departments

What is the difference between a fire commissioner and a fire chief?

A fire commissioner is the head officer at the state level, responsible for supervision of all subsidiary stations, as well as oversight of safety regulations and fire codes. A fire chief is often the acting head of a municipal or volunteer firefighting department.

What is the process to become a firefighter?

Fire departments have varying requirements. Prospective firefighters must pass both psychological and physical exams. Candidates must pass background checks and drug tests.

I have a concern that may involve the Fire Department. Should I call 9-1-1?

If you ever see or smell smoke, it's safest to call 9-1-1 immediately. Still, if you have a different concern, perhaps a question about fire safety or building inspection, you should call the department's non-emergency phone number during normal business hours.