Missouri Court

Find Missouri courts and courthouses, such as federal, state, district, superior, criminal, common, circuit, judicial, judiciary, divorce, appeals, family, traffic, and small claims courts. Courts provide information on legal cases, law documents, case searches, and appeals.


Courts by County

Adair County Andrew County Atchison County Audrain County Barry County Barton County Bates County Benton County Bollinger County Boone County Buchanan County Butler County Caldwell County Callaway County Camden County Cape Girardeau County Carroll County Carter County Cass County Cedar County Chariton County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Cole County Cooper County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Daviess County DeKalb County Dent County Douglas County Dunklin County Franklin County Gasconade County Gentry County Greene County Grundy County Harrison County Henry County Hickory County Holt County Howard County Howell County Iron County Jackson County Jasper County Jefferson County Johnson County Knox County Laclede County Lafayette County Lawrence County Lewis County Lincoln County Linn County Livingston County Macon County Madison County Maries County Marion County McDonald County Mercer County Miller County Mississippi County Moniteau County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Nodaway County Oregon County Osage County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry County Pettis County Phelps County Pike County Platte County Polk County Pulaski County Putnam County Ralls County Randolph County Ray County Reynolds County Ripley County Saline County Schuyler County Scotland County Scott County Shannon County Shelby County St. Charles County St. Clair County St. Francois County St. Louis County St. Louis Ste. Genevieve County Stoddard County Stone County Sullivan County Taney County Texas County Vernon County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Worth County Wright County

What does a Court do?

A court is a government institution that tries criminal cases and decides civil disputes.

The court serves as an unbiased third party which interprets and applies laws to matters in question. Courts are led by one or more judges or justices who serve as decision-makers.

Commonly asked questions about Courts

Does a Court have the final say on an issue?

Courts have the final word in their particular jurisdictions. Still, the parties affected by court decisions may appeal their decisions to courts of higher jurisdiction, including appeals courts as well the U.S. Supreme Court, which has the highest jurisdiction to make decisions and judgments. Because of the large volume of legal decisions and judgments which are appealed, very few cases are important enough to be decided by the Supreme Court.

Are television court shows acting as real Courts?

Television-based court shows are not part of the actual judicial system. They have no legal standing, and rulings in those courts are not legally enforceable. Often, these shows are criticized for misrepresenting the nature of real legal proceedings.

Do I have to go to Court?

If you are asked to appear in court, generally you must go in person. Occasionally, the judge may allow an attorney to appear alone on your behalf, but this is rare. In cases where you are a defendant or are named in a subpoena or jury duty assignment, you must appear in person. Failing to appear as ordered may be considered a serious crime in of itself.