Missouri Court

Find Missouri courts and courthouses, such as federal, state, district, superior, criminal, common, circuit, judicial, judiciary, divorce, appeals, family, traffic, and small claims courts. Courts provide information on legal cases, law documents, case searches, and appeals.


Courts by County

Adair County Andrew County Atchison County Audrain County Barry County Barton County Bates County Benton County Bollinger County Boone County Buchanan County Butler County Caldwell County Callaway County Camden County Cape Girardeau County Carroll County Carter County Cass County Cedar County Chariton County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Cole County Cooper County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Daviess County DeKalb County Dent County Douglas County Dunklin County Franklin County Gasconade County Gentry County Greene County Grundy County Harrison County Henry County Hickory County Holt County Howard County Howell County Iron County Jackson County Jasper County Jefferson County Johnson County Knox County Laclede County Lafayette County Lawrence County Lewis County Lincoln County Linn County Livingston County Macon County Madison County Maries County Marion County McDonald County Mercer County Miller County Mississippi County Moniteau County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Nodaway County Oregon County Osage County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry County Pettis County Phelps County Pike County Platte County Polk County Pulaski County Putnam County Ralls County Randolph County Ray County Reynolds County Ripley County Saline County Schuyler County Scotland County Scott County Shannon County Shelby County St. Charles County St. Clair County St. Francois County St. Louis County St. Louis Ste. Genevieve County Stoddard County Stone County Sullivan County Taney County Texas County Vernon County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Worth County Wright County

What is a Court?

A Court is a government institution where legal disputes are resolved in accordance with the law. In Criminal Courts, the government brings a case against a defendant who is accused of breaking the law. In Civil Courts, the Court settles disputes between citizens that they are unable to resolve on their own.

The Court system in the United States is made up of a federal Court system and fifty state Court systems. In each system, there are two general types of Courts: Trial Courts and Appellate Courts. Trial Courts hear cases for the first time. In a Trial Court, both sides of the dispute present evidence to support their version of events, and a jury is usually called on to decide the case. One judge presides over the case in a Trial Court. Appellate Courts hear appeals of decisions reached at Trial Courts. No new evidence is presented in Appellate Court. A judge or panel of judges decides the appeal rather than a jury.

In the federal Court system, District Courts serve as the Trial Courts. In the state Court systems, Trial Courts are further grouped into Courts of general jurisdiction and Courts of limited jurisdiction. Courts of general jurisdiction are Courts that can hear cases of any kind, including felonies. The names for Courts of general jurisdiction vary from state to state, but they are often referred to as Superior Courts or District Courts and may be organized to hear cases within certain geographic areas, such as counties. Courts of limited jurisdiction may be limited to hearing only cases involving misdemeanors, small claims, or traffic and other minor violations. Courts of limited jurisdiction may also only hear cases on specific subject matter, such as Probate Courts and Family Courts.

The Appellate Courts in the federal Court system consist of twelve Circuit Courts that are organized regionally and the U.S. Supreme Court, which is the highest Court in the country. Appellate Courts at the state level mirror the federal structure, with one or more Appellate Courts and a State Supreme Court.