Kentucky Sheriff

Find Kentucky sheriff's office, department, headquarters, jail and detention center. Sheriffs provide information on records, arrests, inmates, warrants, and mugshots.


Sheriffs by County

Adair County Allen County Anderson County Ballard County Barren County Bath County Bell County Boone County Bourbon County Boyd County Boyle County Bracken County Breathitt County Breckinridge County Bullitt County Butler County Caldwell County Calloway County Campbell County Carlisle County Carroll County Carter County Casey County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Crittenden County Cumberland County Daviess County Edmonson County Elliott County Estill County Fayette County Fleming County Floyd County Franklin County Fulton County Gallatin County Garrard County Grant County Graves County Grayson County Green County Greenup County Hancock County Hardin County Harlan County Harrison County Hart County Henderson County Henry County Hickman County Hopkins County Jackson County Jefferson County Jessamine County Johnson County Kenton County Knott County Knox County Larue County Laurel County Lawrence County Lee County Leslie County Letcher County Lewis County Lincoln County Livingston County Logan County Lyon County Madison County Magoffin County Marion County Marshall County Martin County Mason County McCracken County McCreary County McLean County Meade County Menifee County Mercer County Metcalfe County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County Muhlenberg County Nelson County Nicholas County Ohio County Oldham County Owen County Owsley County Pendleton County Perry County Pike County Powell County Pulaski County Robertson County Rockcastle County Rowan County Russell County Scott County Shelby County Simpson County Spencer County Taylor County Todd County Trimble County Union County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Whitley County Wolfe County Woodford County

What is a Sheriff?

A Sheriff is the chief law enforcement officer for a jurisdiction and the head of the Sheriff's Department. Sheriff's Departments are almost always county level agencies, though a few cities or consolidated city-counties have a Sheriff. Most Sheriffs are elected officials who usually serve four-year terms, and they are responsible for oversight of the other employees of the Sheriff's Department. The duties of a Sheriff and the Sheriff's Department vary from state to state and, in some cases, even within a state.

In some states, the County Sheriff's Department is a general-purpose law enforcement agency, similar to a Police Department. They may have the same powers and authority as a Police Department, with responsibility for patrolling any unincorporated areas of a county or areas not covered by a municipal Police force. In some cases, the Sheriff's Department may be the law enforcement agency for the entirety of a county, including incorporated cities.

Depending on the state and county, the Sheriff's Department may be responsible for a variety of functions related to law enforcement. Most manage the county jails, which entails taking custody of prisoners and holding them until they are discharged, as well as managing the operations of the jail and maintaining the facility. Sheriff's Departments may also transport inmates to other detention facilities and court.

Many Sheriff's Departments provide security services for courts and other public buildings. Sheriff's Departments ensure the safe passage of judges, conduct screening, and maintain courtroom safety.

In some counties, the Sheriff's Department may be responsible for serving and executing a range of legal processes issued by non-criminal courts. These include issuing summonses and subpoenas, court orders such as contempt of court, divorce papers, and evictions notices. In some cases, the Department may pursue and collect delinquent taxes.

There are typically no requirements for elected Sheriffs to have any specific legal or law enforcement experience or training, though most come from a law enforcement background. Deputies and other law enforcement officers in a Sheriff's Department go through the state's law enforcement training academy.