Kentucky Fire Department

Find Kentucky fire departments, city fire stations, firefighters, brigades, chiefs, inspectors, marshals, and local volunteers. Fire departments provide information on fire risk assessment, permits, fire alarms, and safety guidance.


Fire Departments by County

Adair County Allen County Anderson County Ballard County Barren County Bath County Bell County Boone County Bourbon County Boyd County Boyle County Bracken County Breathitt County Breckinridge County Bullitt County Butler County Caldwell County Calloway County Campbell County Carlisle County Carroll County Carter County Casey County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Crittenden County Cumberland County Daviess County Edmonson County Elliott County Estill County Fayette County Fleming County Floyd County Franklin County Fulton County Gallatin County Garrard County Grant County Graves County Grayson County Green County Greenup County Hancock County Hardin County Harlan County Harrison County Hart County Henderson County Henry County Hickman County Hopkins County Jackson County Jefferson County Jessamine County Johnson County Kenton County Knott County Knox County Larue County Laurel County Lawrence County Lee County Leslie County Letcher County Lewis County Lincoln County Livingston County Logan County Lyon County Madison County Magoffin County Marion County Marshall County Martin County Mason County McCracken County McCreary County McLean County Meade County Menifee County Mercer County Metcalfe County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County Muhlenberg County Nelson County Nicholas County Ohio County Oldham County Owen County Owsley County Pendleton County Perry County Pike County Powell County Pulaski County Rockcastle County Rowan County Russell County Scott County Shelby County Simpson County Spencer County Taylor County Todd County Trigg County Trimble County Union County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Whitley County Wolfe County Woodford County

What is a Fire Department?

A Fire Department is a government agency, usually at the county or local level, that provides fire protection and emergency response services to the community with a mission to prevent the loss of life and property. In addition to responding to calls for fire suppression, Fire Departments respond to medical emergencies, incidents involving hazardous materials, rescue calls, and motor vehicle or other accidents.

Fire Departments may be staffed with paid professional firefighters, volunteers, or a combination of the two. Professional Fire Departments are usually organized around a central command with response units, known as fire companies, geographically dispersed throughout the jurisdiction. Volunteer Fire Departments may be organized with a similar structure or as independent fire districts with their own fire company. Larger, more urbanized communities are more likely to have Professional Fire Departments, while Volunteer Fire Departments tend to be more common in small and rural communities.

In an emergency situation, 911 calls are received at a designated public safety answering point (PSAP). The PSAP routes the call to the appropriate dispatch agency, which coordinates the Fire Department response. The responding fire company may be determined based on geographic location or the resource needed for the call, such as an aerial ladder, water pumper, tanker truck, brush fire vehicle, rescue vehicle, or paramedic. In many cases, multiple resources are dispatched to the emergency.

Fire prevention may be incorporated into Fire Department operations, or it may be organized as a separate department under the Fire Marshal. Fire prevention involves the enforcement of the Fire Code and is closely associated with the building code and building permitting process. The Fire Marshal is typically involved in the plan review process for new construction or renovation projects, and is responsible for ensuring that Fire Code requirements are met before signing off on design plans. Other common fire prevention efforts include educational programs in schools, public information campaigns, smoke detector distribution programs, and outreach at public events. The Fire Marshal also investigates structure fires to determine their causes.

Some Fire Departments seek accreditation by the Center for Public Safety Excellence. A Fire Department can become accredited if it has adopted best practices in the delivery of services.