Kentucky District Attorney

Find Kentucky district attorney, DA, and county, prosecuting, state, and commonwealth attorneys. District attorneys provide information on criminal court cases, public safety, legal cases, and law documents.


District Attorneys by County

Adair County Allen County Anderson County Ballard County Barren County Bath County Bell County Boone County Bourbon County Boyd County Boyle County Bracken County Breathitt County Breckinridge County Bullitt County Butler County Calloway County Campbell County Carlisle County Carroll County Carter County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Crittenden County Cumberland County Daviess County Edmonson County Elliott County Estill County Fayette County Fleming County Floyd County Franklin County Fulton County Gallatin County Garrard County Grant County Graves County Grayson County Green County Hancock County Hardin County Harlan County Harrison County Hart County Henderson County Henry County Hickman County Hopkins County Jackson County Jefferson County Jessamine County Johnson County Kenton County Knott County Knox County Larue County Laurel County Lawrence County Lee County Leslie County Letcher County Lewis County Lincoln County Livingston County Logan County Lyon County Madison County Magoffin County Marion County Marshall County Martin County Mason County McCracken County McCreary County McLean County Meade County Menifee County Mercer County Metcalfe County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County Muhlenberg County Nelson County Nicholas County Ohio County Oldham County Owen County Owsley County Pendleton County Perry County Pike County Powell County Pulaski County Robertson County Rockcastle County Rowan County Russell County Scott County Shelby County Simpson County Spencer County Taylor County Todd County Trigg County Trimble County Union County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Whitley County Wolfe County Woodford County

What is a District Attorney?

A District Attorney is an attorney who prosecutes criminal cases for the government at the federal, state, county, or local level. The District Attorney is part of the Department of Justice and typically heads a prosecutor's office staffed with multiple attorneys who act on behalf of the District Attorney. District Attorneys take a lead role in multiple phases of a criminal case and exercise a great deal of discretion in how a case is handled. District Attorneys may delegate certain cases, or aspects of cases, to other attorneys in their office.

The District Attorney decides whether or not to prosecute an offender. The evidence provided by a law enforcement agency may or may not be sufficient to move a case forward, and the District Attorney must evaluate the strength and admissibility of the available evidence before prosecuting the offender.

In almost all states, a Grand Jury is convened for felony cases before formal criminal charges are issued. The District Attorney is responsible for presenting evidence to the Grand Jury, which then decides whether or not there is probable cause for criminal charges. The District Attorney also determines whether to offer or accept a plea bargain.

For cases that go to trial, the District Attorney, along with the defense attorney, will select a jury. After jury selection, the District Attorney makes opening statements, presents the government's case for conviction, and makes objections to the defense attorney's case. If the jury convicts the individual accused of breaking the law, the District Attorney makes recommendations for sentencing. If the jury finds the defendant not guilty, the District Attorney determines whether or not to appeal the case to a higher-level court.

Depending on the jurisdiction, the District Attorney may be elected or appointed. The President appoints U.S. District Attorneys, which are usually referred to as U.S. Attorneys. The District Attorney for a state is most often referred to as the State's Attorney. Most State's Attorneys are elected, while the governor appoints the State's Attorney in a handful of states. Some counties and cities have District Attorneys, who are either elected or appointed by the chief executive.