Kansas Fire Department

Find Kansas fire departments, city fire stations, firefighters, brigades, chiefs, inspectors, marshals, and local volunteers. Fire departments provide information on fire risk assessment, permits, fire alarms, and safety guidance.


Fire Departments by County

Allen County Anderson County Atchison County Barber County Barton County Bourbon County Brown County Butler County Chase County Chautauqua County Cherokee County Cheyenne County Clark County Clay County Cloud County Coffey County Cowley County Crawford County Decatur County Dickinson County Doniphan County Douglas County Edwards County Elk County Ellis County Ellsworth County Finney County Ford County Franklin County Geary County Gove County Graham County Grant County Gray County Greeley County Greenwood County Hamilton County Harper County Harvey County Haskell County Hodgeman County Jackson County Jefferson County Jewell County Johnson County Kearny County Kingman County Kiowa County Labette County Lane County Leavenworth County Lincoln County Linn County Logan County Lyon County Marion County Marshall County McPherson County Meade County Miami County Mitchell County Montgomery County Morris County Morton County Nemaha County Neosho County Ness County Norton County Osage County Osborne County Ottawa County Pawnee County Phillips County Pottawatomie County Pratt County Rawlins County Reno County Republic County Rice County Riley County Rooks County Rush County Russell County Saline County Scott County Sedgwick County Seward County Shawnee County Sheridan County Sherman County Smith County Stafford County Stanton County Stevens County Sumner County Thomas County Trego County Wabaunsee County Wallace County Washington County Wichita County Wilson County Woodson County Wyandotte County

What does a Fire Department do?

A fire department is responsible for firefighting, fire prevention, and emergency medical services. In addition to putting out fires, members of the fire department provide rescue services and disaster recovery assistance. Most of these departments are operated by city and county governments. Some departments, mostly in small rural communities, are staffed entirely by volunteers, although, paid, professional firemen staff the typical firefighting organization.

Some departments specialize in fighting wildfires, and others are trained to respond to industrial and hazardous materials fires. Firefighters are known for their quick response and 24-hour availability, and for their professionalism. They also perform fire-safety inspections including checking smoke detectors, and may supply fire extinguishers to people who need them.

Commonly asked questions about Fire Departments

What is the difference between a fire commissioner and a fire chief?

A fire commissioner is the head officer at the state level, responsible for supervision of all subsidiary stations, as well as oversight of safety regulations and fire codes. A fire chief is often the acting head of a municipal or volunteer firefighting department.

What is the process to become a firefighter?

Fire departments have varying requirements. Prospective firefighters must pass both psychological and physical exams. Candidates must pass background checks and drug tests.

I have a concern that may involve the Fire Department. Should I call 9-1-1?

If you ever see or smell smoke, it's safest to call 9-1-1 immediately. Still, if you have a different concern, perhaps a question about fire safety or building inspection, you should call the department's non-emergency phone number during normal business hours.