Kansas Court

Find Kansas courts and courthouses, such as federal, state, district, superior, criminal, common, circuit, judicial, judiciary, divorce, appeals, family, traffic, and small claims courts. Courts provide information on legal cases, law documents, case searches, and appeals.


Courts by County

Allen County Anderson County Atchison County Barber County Barton County Bourbon County Brown County Butler County Chase County Chautauqua County Cherokee County Cheyenne County Clark County Clay County Cloud County Coffey County Comanche County Cowley County Crawford County Decatur County Dickinson County Doniphan County Douglas County Edwards County Elk County Ellis County Ellsworth County Finney County Ford County Franklin County Geary County Gove County Graham County Grant County Gray County Greeley County Greenwood County Hamilton County Harper County Harvey County Haskell County Hodgeman County Jackson County Jefferson County Jewell County Johnson County Kearny County Kingman County Kiowa County Labette County Lane County Leavenworth County Lincoln County Linn County Logan County Lyon County Marion County Marshall County McPherson County Meade County Miami County Mitchell County Montgomery County Morris County Morton County Nemaha County Neosho County Ness County Norton County Osage County Osborne County Ottawa County Pawnee County Phillips County Pottawatomie County Pratt County Rawlins County Reno County Republic County Rice County Riley County Rooks County Rush County Russell County Saline County Scott County Sedgwick County Seward County Shawnee County Sheridan County Sherman County Smith County Stafford County Stanton County Stevens County Sumner County Thomas County Trego County Wabaunsee County Wallace County Washington County Wichita County Wilson County Woodson County Wyandotte County

About Courts

What is a Court?

A Court is a government institution where legal disputes are resolved in accordance with the law. In Criminal Courts, the government brings a case against a defendant who is accused of breaking the law. In Civil Courts, the Court settles disputes between citizens that they are unable to resolve on their own.

The Court system in the United States is made up of a federal Court system and fifty state Court systems. In each system, there are two general types of Courts: Trial Courts and Appellate Courts. Trial Courts hear cases for the first time. In a Trial Court, both sides of the dispute present evidence to support their version of events, and a jury is usually called on to decide the case. One judge presides over the case in a Trial Court. Appellate Courts hear appeals of decisions reached at Trial Courts. No new evidence is presented in Appellate Court. A judge or panel of judges decides the appeal rather than a jury.

In the federal Court system, District Courts serve as the Trial Courts. In the state Court systems, Trial Courts are further grouped into Courts of general jurisdiction and Courts of limited jurisdiction. Courts of general jurisdiction are Courts that can hear cases of any kind, including felonies. The names for Courts of general jurisdiction vary from state to state, but they are often referred to as Superior Courts or District Courts and may be organized to hear cases within certain geographic areas, such as counties. Courts of limited jurisdiction may be limited to hearing only cases involving misdemeanors, small claims, or traffic and other minor violations. Courts of limited jurisdiction may also only hear cases on specific subject matter, such as Probate Courts and Family Courts.

The Appellate Courts in the federal Court system consist of twelve Circuit Courts that are organized regionally and the U.S. Supreme Court, which is the highest Court in the country. Appellate Courts at the state level mirror the federal structure, with one or more Appellate Courts and a State Supreme Court.