Death Records

Search free public death records, including death certificates, death index, deceased records, death register & registry, obituaries, and death notices.



What are Death Records?

Death records help families of the recently deceased go through the difficult process of settling financial and legal matters. These documents, signed by an authorized medical professional, register essential facts about a person's death such as the time, place and cause of death. When asking for a copy of the death certificate, it's crucial to obtain several copies. Not only will a family need these records to take care of the deceased person's funeral and publish an obituary, but the records will also be used for property, insurance, and vehicle transfers, as well as settling wills and estates. Local governments keep official death registries on state, county, and city levels. Nationally, records are available in the National Death Index. The state usually issues certified death records in limited quantity for a small fee.

Death Records provide

  1. Data related to a person's death.
  2. Proof of death needed when family members deal with financial institutions to close a deceased person's bank account.
  3. Vital statistics for the National Death Index that are accessible online and kept for statistical purposes.
  4. A death certificate, which is necessary for dealing with insurance, outstanding accounts, and the DMV. Family survivors who need to transfer car titles, registrations and utility accounts are required to produce a death certificate in order to complete the process.
  5. Necessary obituary information for printed newspapers or online registries of death notices.

Are there different types of Death Records?

The state typically issues public death records in both certified and uncertified types. The certified death record copy from public registries must be submitted in official legal procedures. Apart from the public death records available on a local level, some additional public and private providers keep resources for deceased records online or in offline death registries. Depending on the organization or institution responsible for the death registry, death records can be civil, church, cemetery, newspaper or obituary, as well as found in census death records, city death directories or ancestry death records.